PEM Source

Your source for all things Pediatric Emergency Medicine

All posts with tag: "ent"

Tips and Tricks

Some tips and tricks for examining children's throats:
  1. Don't do it until after you've gotten your lung, heart, and abdomen exam - once you make them cry, it's game over
  2. A helpful position for young children is to sit on the parent's lap facing the parent, legs straddling the parent. Then, have the parent lean the child back so he/she is laying supine on the parent's knees with the head hanging back (the dentist chair view)
  3. Older children can be asked to pant like a dog, scream, or sing "ah ah ah ah ah" opera-style
  4. Sometimes if you do the ear exam first, the child will yell and then you can see the throat
The Katz extractor is a great tool for removing nasal foreign bodies, as shown on the video here (I have no financial interests in this product). But, if you don't have one available, get a Fogarty cardiac embolectomy catheter from the O.R., and this will do nicely as well. For many many tips and tricks on removing foreign bodies in the head and neck, go to PEMplaybook
Cut a narrow caliber ETT short to create a semi-rigid suction catheter for foreign body removal of the nose or ears.  (From EM News September 2009, Tricks of the Trade: An Improvised, Semi-Rigid, Nasal/Aural Suction Catheter, by Timothy McGuirk DO)
Use a laryngoscope upside down as a tongue blade, or use a self-lighting pelvic exam speculum (remove top half of the speculum)

PEM Questions

A 17yo boy comes in with complaint of inability to breathe from the right nares. He was seen 2 days ago by his PMD and prescribed amoxicillin for sinusitis, but is not improving. He denies placing any foreign body in his nose. He was in an altercation at school and was hit in the nose 4 days ago. Which of the following would be the most appropriate treatment of this patient’s condition? Septal hematoma http://rhinitis.hawkelibrary.com/album09/83_G A. Change antibiotics to amoxicillin-clavulanate B. Attempt removal of foreign body C. Incision and drainage and nasal packing D. Referral to otorhinolaryngologist for polyp removal Also, if you’re interested in the Peds ID Antibiotics Question of the Week, you can find it here
You are seeing a 12yo child with right ear pain for 2 days. He has been swimming recently. On examination, he has pain when you pull on the pinna of the ear to straighten the canal, and the canal is swollen and full of purulent discharge. He is afebrile and has no previous history of ear infection. Which of the following is FALSE regarding the management of this patient? A. Systemic antibiotics play no role B. If the patient had a history of pressure equalization tubes, neomycin + polymyxin B + hydrocortisone (cortisporin) drops would be contraindicated C. The patient should be advised not to swim while undergoing treatment D. Pain can be treated with antipyrine + benzocaine (auralgan) drops E. Fluoroquinolone drops are the most commonly used antibiotic therapy
A 17yo boy presents with severe sore throat for two days, and fever to 39. He has difficulty swallowing due to pain. He has no cough, congestion, nor ill contacts. His immunizations are up to date. On examination, he is alert, has no respiratory distress or stridor. His oropharynx has 2+ tonsils which are somewhat red, no exudate, no vesicles, no peritonsillar swelling. He has tender cervical lymphadenopathy and is very tender on palpation of his anterior neck at the level of the hyoid bone. The most appropriate management is: A. Obtain lateral neck X-ray in the ED and consult ENT specialist B. Consult ENT specialist to intubate the patient in the O.R. C. Give dexamethasone and penicillin-benzathine and discharge home D. Recommend supportive care for a viral URI E. Obtain a CT scan to evaluate for deep neck infection
A 2 year old is brought in that has chewed on an electrical cord. He has a scab in the corner of his mouth and no active bleeding and is otherwise well appearing with no other trauma. What delayed complication can occur?

Conundrums

You are seeing a 35 month old boy with fever and sore throat x 2 days. He has no cough or runny nose, but his sister also had fever and sore throat recently, and his mom has a cough. His temp is 38.5. He has no tonsillar exudate or palatal petechiae, and only tender cervical lymphadenopathy. He is otherwise well appearing, previously healthy, and is well hydrated. [poll id="6"]
Nearly 3 year old girl was eating nuts and had a coughing episode. 6 year old sibling told parents "she's choking on the nuts." In the ED, patient is completely asymptomatic, has a normal CXR and a 100% O2 sat on room air. [poll id="7"]

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